Drone Regulations in Cameroon

A list of drone regulations and links for drone pilots in Cameroon

Cameroon Regulations Overview:

drone-rules-registration

Is a registration necessary?

You need to have Registration.
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Recreational use of drones allowed?

Yes, it is allowed.
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Is drone insurance mandatory?

It is recommended.
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Commercial use of drones permitted?

Yes, but with conditions.
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Does the drone need a badge?

Recommended
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Maximum Altitude:

120 metters
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Respect the privacy of other people

Don’t forget this rule.
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Not allowed drones near airports

Stay away from Arports.

Drone regulations in Cameroon

drone-regulations-in-cameroon

When you decide travel and fly your drone in Cameroon you need to be inform about the drone regulations about this. Always read the latest rules and information on the official web pages.

Main responsive authorities

Main responsive Authority:  Cameroon Civil Aviation Authority (CCAA)

Contacts

contact@ccaa.aero / +237 2 230 3090

Drone regulations in Cameroon

Special Travel Considerations for Foreigners

If you are a foreigner and want to bring your drone in the territory of Cameroon, you must have:

 – A Permit from the CCAA. If you don’t have this permit, you can not enter in Cameroon.

 – Absolutely each flight have to be approved in advance. And you need to have this approval 30 days in advance. 

 – The Flight Approval from the CCAA must be requested by submitting an application to  Cameroon Civil Aviation Authority / Base Aérienne 101 / BP: 6998 Yaounde. 

For any question you have, contact with the official CCAA directory at the contact details: contact@ccaa.aero / +237 2 230 3090

General Drone Rules for Flying a Drone in Cameroon

 – Max allowed hight of the flight – 120 meters. 

 – Keep all the time visual line of sight with the drone. 

 – Minimum distance to any Airport – 5.5 kilometres. 

 – The drones must not fly closer than 15 meters to any object and structures ( vehicles, buildings, animals or people). 

 – Flying over crowds is forbidden. 

 – Flying at night is forbidden. 

 – More information you can get from this document created by the CCAA.

We advise you to check always the official sources for latest drone regulations in Cameroon.

Some tourist travel tips for Cameroon

Cameroon is called by locals “Africa in one country” or “Little Africa”. It is simply its pulsating heart in Central Africa, a crazy mosaic of active volcanoes, black sand beaches, deep tropical forests and surreal sand landscapes torn by the strange rock formations of the Sahel. The country is a unique miniature of Africa because of its ethnic and cultural splendour, which, like a colorful cloth for sewing the clothes of local women, has covered its entire territory. There are Francophone and English regions in Cameroon, not to mention about 250 local languages. The country is a huge ethnic and linguistic mosaic, which, unlike so many of its neighbours, enjoys great stability. Cameroon is not a classic African country. There are no civil wars and strife here and they have a relatively well-developed industry.

With a fairly well-developed road infrastructure, travelling here is much easier than in many parts of Africa.

– Everyone here must wear something on their heads, makossa music sets the rhythm of hearts and bodies, the streets smell of baked bread, and African bliss is just a piece of grilled fish and sweaty beer.

The beautiful country of Cameroon is located in the Gulf of Guinea, on the west coast of Africa, located between Nigeria in the north and Equatorial Guinea in the south. Cameroon boasts an incredible variety of natural landscapes, which include rainforests, beaches, mountains and savannas. That is why the locals immodestly call their country “Africa in miniature” or “Africa in one country”. Immodest, because in this case modesty remains for those who have nothing else to show.
The area was a German protectorate, but after the First World War, it was divided between the British and the French, with the French receiving a larger share. Britain controlled the northernmost strip along the Nigerian border. French Cameroon gained independence in 1960, and especially the Christian southern part of British Cameroon voted to join the Republic of Cameroon the following year.

The northern two-thirds of British Cameroon, mostly Muslims, eventually joined Nigeria. In recent years, Cameroon has performed well economically, and today the country enjoys greater political and social stability than most African countries. However, many people still live in poverty, and the country is ruled by an authoritarian president.

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